Growing Pains Keeping Your Child Up At Night?

If your child has ever complained of not being able to sleep at night due to leg pain, he or she may be experiencing what many people refer to as growing pains -- a common occurrence seen in kids during their growth and development years.

Growing pains are often characterized by a sharp, throbbing pain in the leg muscles, usually occurring during the night and sometimes late afternoon without an apparent cause. The nighttime pain can be so intense that it is enough to wake the child from sleep. While there is no evidence that a child's growth is painful, these pains often occur during an active day of running, jumping or swimming.

Whenever a child is afflicted by episodes of recurrent leg pain, it is always best to have them evaluated by Foot HealthCare Associates. Other foot and leg conditions should be ruled out before a diagnosis of growing pains is made. If the examination is normal, with no redness, tenderness, swelling, or limitation of movement, then it is generally safe to say the child is suffering from growing pains.

Consult with a physician or a podiatrist at Foot HealthCare Associates if aching legs are a chronic complaint or if the pain is so severe it interferes with the child's daily activities. Persistent pain and other unusual symptoms may indicate a more serious problem. The following symptoms are not due to growing pains and should be evaluated by a doctor:

There are no treatments or medications available for growing pains, but parents can help ease the pain with simple home remedies.

While growing pains are commonly seen in young children during the growth and development years, lower extremity pain can also be caused by mechanical misalignments and structural imperfections. A thorough evaluation is crucial in order to determine the exact cause of your child's leg pain. If growing pains are the cause of your child's discomfort, rest assured that the pain is only temporary and will pass with time.

Author
Ernest Isaacson Dr. Ernest Isaacson is a graduate of the Scholl College of Podiatric Medicine at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science. After completing two years of comprehensive training in various medical specialties including internal medicine, general surgery, orthopedic surgery, vascular surgery, plastic surgery and podiatric medicine, Dr. Isaacson completed a comprehensive one-year podiatric surgical residency. Dr. Isaacson is active in research and publication in basic and clinical science. Dr. Isaacson is also a dedicated family man who enjoys running, reading and spending time with his family.

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